Weekly Round-Up: Women’s Health News 7.19.13


From new treatments to gonorrhea to the role of birth control in improving maternal and child health, it was a week full of promising health news for women. Read on!

gonorrhea bacteriaBreakthrough in Treating Gonorrhea
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), gonorrhea is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases in the United States with an estimated 800,000 gonorrhea infections per year.  An increasing number of these cases involve a strain of the bacteria that is resistant to current antibiotic regimens.  However, a recent trial conducted by the CDC and the National Institutes of Health found that two new antibiotic regimens using existing drugs could be effective in treating this resistant strain.  This is exciting news since untreated gonorrhea, which can lead to Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID), is one of the leading causes of infertility in women. Visit the CDC newsroom for more information.

A healthy mom and her toddlerContraception Key To Decreasing Maternal, Child Deaths, U.N. Panel Says
The World Health Organization estimates that a woman dies from pregnancy or childbirth-related causes every 90 seconds.  Now, according to a United Nations report released this month, improving access to contraception should be a key element in efforts to reduce maternal and child deaths.  In one of our favorite sayings, Family Planning = Healthy Women = Healthy Families = Healthy Communities. To read more, see this article in the Los Angeles Times‘ “Science Now” reports.

teengirlsCalifornia’s Teen Birth Rate Continues to Drop
Over the past 20 years, California’s teen birth rate has dropped from a peak of 70.9 per every 1000 girls, ages 15-10 in 1991 to a low of 28.0.  California state attributes the decline to an aggressive multi-pronged approach that includes comprehensive sex education in high schools, community-based programs that promote parent-child communication about sex, and services and support for pregnant and parenting teens.  We believe that another contributing factor is the State’s commitment to increasing teen access to family planning services. To read the press release, click here.

Good news for HIV+ women who want to get pregnant!
A new National Institutes of Health (NIH) study found that the anti-HIV drugs recommended for pregnant HIV+ women do not appear to increase their children’s risk for language delay. Read more…

birthcontrolpillsWhy do some women get pregnant on the pill?
Amanda Mascarelli tackled this question this week in the Washington Post’s Health & Science section.  She started looking for the anser after getting pregnant twice while on the pill.  While most on-the-pill pregnancies occur due to missed pills, a small percentage of women will get pregnant even when using the method correctly.  The other women?   Read how her research lead her to switch to the IUC here.

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