In Case You Missed It! Monday’s Weekly News Round-Up


In case you missed them, here are some of the major news stories that came out regarding nutrition, vitamins and women’s health last week. We decided moved our weekly news round-up from Saturday to Monday in order to reach more people and include breaking news that comes in over the weekend.

If you’re caught in the BART strike, but on some other form of public transit, this might be the perfect way to catch up!  In the news this past week, PTSD, Hep C, battling gender violence world-wide, and some helpful new health resources from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

Is someone you love a baby boomer?  Tell them to get tested for Hep C!

Baby boomers are more likely to get infected with Hep C!Hep C is a very serious form of hepititis; as the most common chronic bloodborne pathogen in the United States it is a leading cause of complications from chronic liver disease. Last week the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) expanded 2004 CDC recommendations for HCV screening in persons at high risk for infection by including so including one-time screening for adults born between 1945 and 1965. The goal is to reduce confusion among healthcare providers, increase awareness of the importance of hepatitis C screening and improve testing rates—ultimately identifying millions of Americans previously unaware of their infection status and preventing the associated liver disease and deaths attributable to undiagnosed chronic HCV infection.  To learn more:

  1. Read the AIDS.gov blog post;
  2. Click here to download the full recommendations.

1 in 3 Women Worldwide Experiences Partner Abuse

Eve Ensler and Christine Schuler Deschryver interviewed by Amy Goodman

A new World Health Organization Report highlights violence against women as a “global health problem of epidemic proportions.” The report represents the first systematic study of global data on the prevalence of violence against women – experienced by 35% of all women worldwide, with intimate partner violence being the most common type, affecting 30% of all women.  Impacts range from broken bones to lower birthweight babies, pregnancy-related complications, depression, impaired social functioning and higher STD rates. The report also includes a review of how health professionals can respond to the problem.  To learn more:

  1. Visit the World Health Organization to read the press release and to download the report, as well as related documents;
  2. Click here to watch Amy Goodman’s interview of Eve Ensler and Congolese Activist, Christine Deschryver to learn about the City of Joy, a revolutionary community for women survivors of gender violence in Bukavu (written transcript also available);
  3. If you life in San Francisco, and either are experiencing intimate partner violence yourself, or have a friend or loved one who is, LEAP (Look to End Abuse Permanently) can help.  LEAP is an organization of healthcare providers and volunteers dedicated to ending intimate partner violence and family violence by establishing screening, treatment, and prevention programs in the health care setting. http://www.leapsf.org/

New HHS Tools

Person using a tablet to surf the InternetThe U.S. Department of Health and Human Services released two new tools this week:

  1. The new HealthCare.gov website will help uninsured Americans to select and sign up for health care coverage that best meets their needs.  Open enrollment begins  October 1. For Spanish speaking consumers, CuidadoDeSalud.gov will also be updated to match HealthCare.gov’s new consumer focus.  Both sites are designed to be viewed on smart phones, as well as computers and tablets.  If you live in California, Covered California (http://www.coveredca.com/) provides the same services in English, Arabic, Armenian, Chinese, Farsi, Hmong, Khmer, Korean, Lao, Russian, Spanish, Tagalog, and Vietnamese.
  2. The myfamily smart phone app allows you to set and customize health alerts and reminders so that you can better manage the health of your family.  It also allows you to keep track of past medical check-ups and vaccinations and to access health information available on healthfinder.gov.  To learn more, go to http://www.healthfinder.gov/stayconnected/.

HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius on PTSD Awareness Month

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a severe anxiety disorder that can occur when people experience a traumatic event.  PTSD can affect anyone – from service men and women returning from the horrors of war to abused children and the survivors of rape, domestic violence, or natural disasters. June was PTSD Awareness Month.  Secretary Sebelius issued a special statement highlighting the month “as an important opportunity to recognize and pledge ourselves to year-round support for the millions of Americans who are working to overcome this challenging and debilitating condition.”  Click here to read the full statement.

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